clarkyboy urban life & style
Holy Hip Hop
Is it possible to have holy hip hop? According to The Truth Behind Hip Hop the answer is no. He claims that hip hop is a religion. However, many believe that the church can use rap music to reach out to young people. Some say that although man created hip hop, just as paper was invented by man to put the word of God on, hip hop can also be be used for God's purpose.
Holy Hip Hop
There is no such thing as Christian music, there are only Christian lyrics. — Rick Warren
Christopher Martin aka Play
'Holy Hip Hop' is the title of a new DVD presented by Christopher Martin, better known as Play from the rap duo Kid 'n Play. He says that he has personally witnessed how Christian rap music can be used as a powerful outreach tool to advance the gospel, positively impact and change lives for the better.

But what is holy hip hop? According to Wikipedia, gospel rap uses Christian-themed lyrics to convey positive messages and express the rapper's faith. While many mainstream rap artists include rhymes about God and Jesus, artists such as Kanye West, DMX, Nas and Tupac Shakur are not considered Christian hip hop, as their lyrics focus on worldly, often profane matters.

Christian hip hop and rap artists tend to be professed Christians, and use the fact that they are urban or suburban as a positive issue to spread their faith, and like all Christian music, it can be experienced as worship.

Christian hip hop has a history of being dismissed by churches as sacrilegious, or devil music. G Craige Lewis makes a living out of preaching his 'anti-holy hip hop' message. No money, no support, and no funded albums were the experience of many artists, but many see Christian rap as being on the brink of mainstream success.
Christopher Martin aka Play
There are several reasons for opposing it. It’s too new. It’s too worldly, even blasphemous. The new Christian music is not as pleasant as the more established style. It puts too much emphasis on instrumental music rather than on godly lyrics. This new music creates disturbances, making people act disorderly. The preceding generation got along without it. — Amazingly, this is not a criticism of holy hip hop, but was written way back in 1723 about the hymns of the day. As Ecclesiastes says, there is nothing new under the sun.
See the trailer for the Holy Hip Hop DVD:
Holy Hip Hop (Windows Media Player)
Holy Hip Hop (RealPlayer)
DVD Video
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What do you think of holy hip hop?
Please let me know.
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How can anyone feel that music is evil? Music isn't evil... spirits and principalities that dwell within this earth and inhabit the mind and body of specific people could be evil. If you are a part of a culture, then you can truly understand it. It's not a race, a community, or a sex, it is a mixture/collaboration of several different components that make up a specific group. The original Hip Hop music was enlightening in the early days... freedom of expression, views, voices, mindsets, a re-birth in a sense as the Renaissance Era. Here we can give the enemy so much power by saying that something as awesome as Holy Hip Hop is evil, when in fact... God created music... the world perverted it... now Holy Hip Hop is taking it back and taking it to a level that a specific generation and "culture" can receive it. If you can't receive it... just leave it be! Is Holy Hip Hop confusion or are you the confused one? Anything that glorifies God to me is beautiful. I am a 38 year old mother from South Carolina. Knine is my brother in Christ. I know his music has touched the lives of young men and women who were lost and when they heard his music and his testimony... LIVES WERE CHANGED! Now you can take that to the bank... cause it's real! — SonyG
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Here's a thought for everyone who disagrees with holy hip hop simply on the basis of the fact that you can't tell it apart aside from the lyrics; in Japan, there's a growing niche for gospel music to the point where Japanese folks are forming their own gospel choirs and none of them are Christians. (Only 3% of Japan is Christian.) To them, gospel music is nothing more than a sound. Similarly hip-hop music is a sound. And how foolish of us to say that hip-hop culture cannot be redeemed! According to our Lord Jesus Christ, even Sodom and Gomorrah were redeemable! (Matthew 11:22-24). — Taryn
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Hiphop can be used for God's purpose to bring souls into the kingdom. — Baffour
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This is what Mase and Kanye West should be doing. — Kicker
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Holy Hip Hop is great! I love the music and the words with the beats. My niece loves to dance — now she dances to music glorifying the Lord. It's good when you hear lil' kids singing lyrics that worship the Lord. — Brittaney
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There is virtually no difference between Holy Hip Hop and the regular Hip Hop. The "new" lifestyle, beats and looks can be termed a lot of other things, but not holy. I understand the love for it and wanting to compromise (being wrapped up in the music myself for a good 16 years before Jesus saved me and delivered me — also from my huge love of secular music). I currently live in a non native english speaking country; the kids out here don't know the difference either, the lyrics don't matter — the spirit is the same!Steve
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I agree with Steve with the fact that there is no real difference between Holy and regular hip hop. In my opinion, adding a couple scripture verses and including the name of Jesus does not necessarily make something holy and acceptable. God is not the author of confusion and (in my opinion) holy hip hop is very confusing, especially to young Christians. I see no difference between the way they perform, dress, act, neither can I tell from the music videos that they are glorifying God... to me it's very hard to distinguish the two. I do believe in getting the youth involved and going into the streets and spreading the word of God, however I do not think we have to conform to the world's standards and methods to do this. This would just be underestimating the power of God to change people's lives, He doesn't need all the help we may think He does.Krystle
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There is nothing like "Holy Hip Hop". Hip-hop is hip-hop. There is a difference between rap and hip-hop. Some people just call everything with a rap in it hip-hop, but there is a difference. Rap is a way of singing or whatever. Hip-hop is a culture that hides behind the fact that rapping is only a way of expressing themselves. You can rap, but hip-hopping is actually believing that you are a god and that Jesus Christ is the white man's God. Hip-hop is pure evil. We say this because satan has found a way to trap us teens and young adults into sin. Satan was the angel of music in heaven — now look at hip-hop.Pauline
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Simply put, He will give us the discernment to distinguish between clean and unclean... holy and unholy. Unfortunately, because the spirit of entertainment (if there is such a thing) has taken over our churches, no one knows what is holy and what is unholy. To call an all-night prayer session... you may get about a handful of people... but call a gospel concert for free, and the house will be packed! Standing room only. I recently went to a church's album release party and it was packed with 20- and 30-somethings... but the following week, I went to a conference that dealt with a big issue in the black community and the church, and there were only about 100 people. It is a sad commentary.JD
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This is what it is, the Bible teaches that all things were created to glorify God, so if all things are created by him, that means the only thing the devil can do is pervert. And that is what he has done with the music of today. Same as the television shows. Christian rap is not secular hip hop. One might say that it is poetic genius. Who are these people to limit what God can do to a culture. Come on man. Get at me. Stay blessed y'all. — Pastor Kells
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I'm the promoter for STP, a Christian rap group based out of Lancaster, California. We don’t associate with the hip hop culture. We just do what God has put in our hearts and minds. I wanna say that in my spirit I feel right about what STP is doing. I can't speak for all the other Christian rap groups out there cause many rappers claim to represent Christ then they use the N-word in their records. That just doesn’t seem right to me. I feel like God is using our talents as a way to encourage and to bless others. — Freddy
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To redeem means to bring back to the original state of affairs. Hip Hop's founding father is still alive today and he tells us what his intentions were in starting the movement. So if we say we redeem Hip Hop, and its origins were bad in the first place, then we are redeeming something bad. To redeem something for good means that it had to be in the first place good. Hip Hop is not that. People don't like to read their Word anyway, so it's hard to get the message across. Flesh can't comprehend the things of the spirit. — Steve Keys
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Damn son that is some crazy lyrics you’re spittin. — Kabacinski
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It can’t be used for good if it is uprooted from evil... How u going to present clean evil to God? — Adrian
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I feel that G Craige Lewis's statement is correct when he informed us that God does not need to use the things of this world to get glory, God was the creator of music and if we as believers in Christ would seek the face of God and get into his presence we would not need to use the tactics of the devil to bring in the youth. We as young people are looking for the truth so that we may receive true deliverance. We have to look at it this way, if we mix the things of the world with the things of God it creates a state of confusion, and if the body of Christ agrees with holy hip hop then we say that we agree with hip hop in the eyes of the youth, which opens up a door that should not be opened. I understand that there is a desire to bring in the youth so that we may be saved and set free and what we need is a person to be an example of God’s glory and people that have the power of the Holy Spirit, that is how you will reach the youth. Prayer is the key, teaches us to seek the face of God. With the body of Christ we can't be fooled by the devil and I pray that the blindfolds are lifted off the eyes of God’s people for the devil is trying to fool many and if we don’t understand the move that is taking place right now in the body of Christ and in the worldly realm many will be deceived. In Jesus' name be set free. — Bonnie
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I just can't get this evil thing, sure hip hop has a bad side and presents the worst kind of example to the youth, but it isn't the music in itself, its how it has been used and the spirit it carries. This can be a pure, spirit filled message, just as it can in any other musical form. Some of the best work in terms of outreach in the UK is coming from hip hop and it isn't watered down in terms of its praise or its beats... it's changing lives and these people aren't coming to know a different god's love. Peace. — Johnny G
Clarkyboy's Choice
Holy Hip Hop Holy Hip Hop
Fasten your seatbelt and prepare to experience the explosive world of spiritually-enlightening holy hip hop ministry, music and entertainment glorifying God! Director and producer Christopher Martin professionally known as Play from the rap and acting duo Kid 'n Play is the feature's host and invites you to meet some of Holy Hip Hop's trail blazin' artists and Ministers of the Gospel, who are a part of a movement that began in the late 1980s and thrives worldwide as one of the fastest growing music genres today, with over 2000 active emcees and legions of fans worldwide. Peep this video and see what these souled out Christian souljahs for the Lord are doing to change the face of music for generations to come with powerful lyrics and bangin' beats — and bringin' nothin' but the Truth. A must see video for any ardent lover of music who wants to be tuned in to the cutting edge, whether you are within or outside the four walls of the church.
USA UK Canada
Holy Hip Hop: Taking the Gospel to the Streets, Volume 3 Holy Hip Hop: Taking the Gospel to the Streets, Volume 3
Holy Hip Hop: Taking the Gospel to the Streets is a definite must for any Christian rap fan, either a veteran fan of the genre or a beginning rookie listener. This compilation has flavor from Willie Will, Choze, Pro-Vision, Fedel, Eckspress, K-Drama, Mahogany Jones, MoBigga, NuSkool, Ryan Daniel, The Great Commission, and XROSS. Produced by Christopher "Play" Martin (for those of you that don't know — a former member of Kid 'n Play from back in the 1980s) and veteran supervising producer, David "Damonsta" Lynch, the hits are blazing off the meter!
Listen to the Go Ye DJ Mega-Mix
USA UK Canada
The Hip-Hop Church: Connecting With the Movement Shaping Our Culture The Hip-Hop Church: Connecting With the Movement Shaping Our Culture
Hip-hop culture is all around us: in the clothes youth wear, in the music they listen to, in the ways they express themselves. It is the language they speak, the rhythm they move to. It is a culture familiar with the hard realities of our broken world; the generation raised with rap knows about the pain. They need to know about the hope. Enter the hip-hop church. Like the culture it rises from, the hip-hop church is relevant and bold. And it speaks to the heart. In this book, pastors Efrem Smith and Phil Jackson show the urgency of connecting hip-hop culture and church to reach a generation with the gospel of Jesus Christ. They give practical ideas from their urban churches and other hip-hop churches about how to engage and incorporate rap, break dancing, poetry and deejays to worship Jesus and preach his Word. Hip-hop culture is shaping the next generation. Ignoring it will not reduce its influence; it will only separate us from the youth moving to its rhythm.
USA UK Canada
Noise and Spirit: The Religious and Spiritual Sensibilities of Rap Music Noise and Spirit: The Religious and Spiritual Sensibilities of Rap Music
Rap music is often seen as a Black secular response to pressing issues of our time. Yet rap has deep connections to African American religious traditions. Noise and Spirit explores the diverse religious dimensions of rap stemming from Islam (including the Nation of Islam and Five Percent Nation), Rastafarianism, and Humanism, as well as Christianity. The book examines rap's dialog with religious traditions, from the ways in which Islamic rap is used as a method of religious and political instruction to the uses of both the blues and Black women's rap for considering the distinction between God and the Devil. The first section explores rap's association with more easily recognizable religious traditions and communities such as Christianity and Islam. The next presents discussions of rap and important spiritual considerations, including on the topic of death. The final wrestles with ways to theologize about the relationship between the sacred and the profane in rap.
USA UK Canada
Jesus and the Hip-Hop Prophets: Spiritual Insights from Lauryn Hill and Tupac Shakur Jesus and the Hip-Hop Prophets: Spiritual Insights from Lauryn Hill and Tupac Shakur
Cleverly organized into seven short "tracks" instead of chapters, this slim volume offers reflections on the lyrics of two popular recording artists, Lauryn Hill and the late 2pac Shakur. That Teter, director of two More Than Conquerors campus ministries, and Gee, pastor of Fountain of Life Family Worship Center, are knowledgeable fans of hip-hop and admirers of the two featured lyricists is unmistakable. Equally evident is their desire to enable their fellow fans to discover the spiritual truths embedded in the lyrics. The book suffers from the typical awkwardness of the first-person narratives of two writers-the "I, Alex" and "My (John's)" type of construction. Still, the book offers a valuable look at the connection between the harshness of urban life and the prophetic warnings from two singers who managed to find hope amid difficult circumstances.
USA UK Canada
Rap and the Eroticizing of Black Youth Rap and the Eroticizing of Black Youth
Are rappers raising Black youth? What kind of values are being taught? Do rap lyrics contribute to the STD and AIDS epidemic? How can we save Black youth? Showing that in its early days rap music led to black consciousness, this book goes on to argue that the current preoccupations of rap — especially the erotic themes expressed and their dramatization in music videos — have led to an unthinking youthful acceptance of profanity, vulgarity, sexual abuse, and violence. The book advocates for a return to rap's origins, for young people to become more selective and critical of today's music, and for parents to take a more active role in monitoring their children's listening habits.
USA UK Canada
The Hip Hop Prayer Book The Hip Hop Prayer Book
A powerful evangelism tool, developed at Trinity Church of Morrisania in the South Bronx, The Hip Hop Prayer Book offers a means to worship that will draw in the young and speak to those not generally spoken to by the Church. Containing daily prayers, psalms, a variety of services, and a selection of bible stories all designed with the enlivening power of Hip Hop in mind. The Hip Hop Prayer Book features Psalm 23 as adapted by Ryan Kearse: "The Lord is all that, I need for nothing. He allows me to chill. He keeps me from being heated and allows me to breathe easy. He guides my life so that I can represent and give shouts out in his Name. And even though I walk through the Hood of death, I don't back down for you have my back. The fact that you have me covered allows me to chill. He provides me with back-up in front of my player-haters and I know that I am a baller and life will be phat. I fall back in the Lord's crib for the rest of my life."
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On Other Pages
The Truth Behind Hip Hop Exposed
You may have heard of a series of DVDs called The Truth Behind Hip Hop. These are produced by Elder G Craige Lewis of Ex Ministries, and are proving to be remarkably popular with young people.
The Truth Behind Hip Hop Exposed
The Truth Behind Hip Hop Exposed
What's Up With Mase?
If, like me, you were surprised to see Pastor Mason Betha rapping with 50 Cent on his single Window Shopping, you might be wondering what's going on. Mase's conversion to Christianity in 1999 is well documented, not least in his autobiography.
Has Ma$e exchanged Creflo Dollar for half a dollar?
Mase
Rap Music and Violence
Gun violence seems to follow the rapper 50 Cent, who has himself been shot nine times, and always wears a bulletproof vest. Now it's claimed that 'Fiddy' makes a profit out of the misery of parents who are burying their children.
Is 50 Cent Bulletproof?: Rap Music and Violence
50 Cent Billboard
T-Bone
"Versatile is who I am," the ever-amped and spirited rapper shouts! "I make music for everybody — stuff for the West Coast gangsters and lowriders, and joints that East Coast cats can appreciate lyrically with beats that can still get the South crunk."
T-Bone
T-Bone
Kirk Franklin
In 1993 a young unknown gospel musician released his debut album — it went on to spend 100 weeks at the top of the Billboard gospel charts, while also crossing over to the R&B side, and becoming in the process the first gospel album ever to sell over a million units.
Kirk Franklin
Kirk Franklin
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